AGL. The Plan.

Australia is currently ranked 24th amongst other countries for renewable energy policy, behind even the United States who are pulling out of the Paris Agreement and have a President who believes climate change is a hoax (1). As Australia’s leading energy company, AGL are uniquely placed to create change but with public opinion of AGL at an all-time low how could they galvanize public opinion to do it?

There were four primary objectives associated with the campaign. Firstly Increase AGL’s NPS by 3%. Secondly, increase brand consideration. Thirdly, increase spontaneous awareness and fourthly, Increase association with core brand attributes.

The strategy for the campaign focused on the two core needs of Australian energy consumers. Provide low cost, reliable and affordable energy in the present and lead the transition from coal to sustainable energy solutions as soon as possible but without compromising the first core need. 

With the lack of an appropriate energy policy from Australian Government we saw an opportunity for AGL to lead Australia’s energy future and to make a bold commitment to get completely out of coal by 2050. This stood in contrast to a government that continued to delay on energy policy and envisaged a future that was heavily reliant on coal. 

An integrated campaign was developed to communicate AGL’s ‘Energy Policy’ and launched across all media channels focusing heavily on digital and social channels where AGL could engage in a conversation with Australians.

The campaign sparked national awareness and debate online, in the streets, across news desks around the country and most importantly with the Prime Minister and in Parliament House. This conversation also helped to drive impressive campaign results. Firstly, in the first month of the campaign NPS increased by 15%, secondly, brand consideration increased by 87%, thirdly spontaneous awareness grew by 78% and fourthly, association with core brand attributes increased by 30%.

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